Christians for Economic Justice

Previously called Christianity Uncut

Tory conference church service challenged by anti-cuts Christians

Christians for Economic Justice have this evening issued the following news release:

 

Tory conference church service challenged by anti-cuts Christians

Conservative Party delegates were this evening greeted by Christians campaigning against austerity as they attended their official conference church service at Birmingham City Church.

Members of Christians for Economic Justice (CEJ) held an act of witness outside the church, singing hymns and seeking to engage the delegates in respectful conversation. They handed out leaflets contrasting Conservative policies that benefit the rich with Jesus’ example of solidarity with the poor and marginalised.

They also offered delegates pieces of bread as a symbol of sharing the world’s resources.

Several Conservatives engaged in conversation and many took leaflets, though a few responded rudely before entering the church service.

CEJ activists readily acknowledged their own failure to live up to Jesus’ teachings, but insisted that solidarity with the poor is a starting-point for Christian discipleship. They argued that the Conservative Party has for centuries served the interests of the super-rich.

CEJ (previously known as Christianity Uncut) involves Christians from a range of church backgrounds, including supporters of several political parties and none.

Nicola Sleapwood, a disabled Christian living in Birmingham, one of the organisers of the act of witness, said:

“However well-intentioned individual Christian Tories may be, their party as a whole is persecuting the sort of people with whom Jesus took sides.

“Solidarity with the poor and marginalised was a consistent and unavoidable theme of Jesus’ life. Jesus’ mother Mary said God had ‘filled the hungry with good things and sent the rich away empty’. Jesus began his ministry by saying he had come ‘to bring good news to the poor’. Jesus liberated disabled people, giving them mobility and inclusion in society. He liberated outcasts with mental health problems.

“In contrast, the Tory government has scrapped the Independent Living Fund, slashed mental health budgets, reduced taxes on the rich and presided over a massive rise in food poverty. The number of emergency food packs given out by Trussell Trust food banks was more than eighteen times higher in 2015-16 than in 2010-11.”


ENDS

 

Notes

 

  1. Christians for Economic Justice (CEJ) is an informal network of Christians campaigning against the UK government’s cuts agenda and the wider injustices of capitalism. We were previously known as Christianity Uncut. We are inspired by Jesus, who took nonviolent direct action in the Jerusalem Temple in solidarity with people who are poor, marginalised and exploited.
  2. CEJ are committed to active nonviolence, rejecting both violence and passivity. We reject verbal abuse and seek to act with a spirit of love for God and humanity rather than hatred towards those with whom we disagree.
  3. CEJ was launched under the name Christianity Uncut in 2011. It is an informal group who come together for particular events and campaigns, so has been more active at some times than others. Under its previous name the group’s actions included organising a ring of prayer at the eviction of the Occupy camp near St Paul’s Cathedral on 28 February 2012.
  4. The number of three-day emergency food parcels handed out by Trussell Trust food banks rose from 61,468 in 2010-11 to 1,109,309 in 2015-16.
  5. For more information, please phone CEJ on 07522 370 839.

 

Advertisements

Disabled people’s care outsourced to profiteers

In the last week it has emerged that a local authority has outsourced care package annual reviews for disabled service users.

As Christians we should, like Jesus, enable and campaign to enable disabled people to live full, independent lives. Care packages are vital in enabling many disabled people to do just this. Without them, lives would be far more restricted and many people would be stuck at home.

We should be particularly outraged by an external, profit-motivated, body, with the explicit aim of making cuts, carrying out these care reviews.

Cuts to care packages can mean disabled people are forced to choose between activities such as eating, washing, or dressing. How can disabled people live liberated lives in this context? They cannot. We should be fighting for a world in which care packages enable disabled people to not just exist, but to live fully and healthily. For example, support with exercising and eating freshly cooked meals should be reintroduced into care packages.

This is impossible when control is handed to an organisation such as Capita with a shocking record on disability assessments and reassessments.

Christians for Economic Justice are therefore deeply concerned by this news, and call on other Christians to join them and organisations such as Disabled People Against Cuts in objecting to developments such as this.

Church House Conference Centre profits from the arms trade

Church House, the administrative headquarters of the Church of England, is this week hosting yet another conference sponsored by arms dealers. The Land Warfare Conference 2015 is organised by the Royal United Services Institute (a right-wing, militarist thinktank) and sponsored by a number of companies that sell arms to oppressive regimes, including Lockheed Martin.

This has been going on in the face of protests for the last three years. Once again, Christians will be holding a vigil outside the conference, when it opens at 8.00am tomorrow (Tuesday 30 June). This time, we will also share the Eucharist, led by a Church of England priest, Adam Dickson.

Church House’s leadership has been dismissive of protest, refusing even to engage with the issues and simply repeating the assertion that the bookings are made by RUSI rather than arms companies – ignoring the fact that the conferences are sponsored by arms companies.

In contrast, we’re pleased to be able to congratulate St Paul’s Cathedral, who confirmed this month that they not only rule out bookings by arms companies but also bookings for events sponsored by arms companies.

The act of worship tomorrow has been organised by the Fellowship of Reconciliation, Pax Christi and the Christian Network of the Campaign AgainstArms Trade (CAAT). We’re proud to stand alongside them. There are more details here.

  Church House vigil 140709

CEJ backs disabled people fighting closure of Independent Living Fund

Next week, on Tuesday 30th June, the UK government’s closure of the Independent Living Fund (ILF) will come into effect. The ILF supports physically disabled adults with high-level needs to live in their own homes.

As Disabled People Against the Cuts (DPAC) have pointed out, its closure directly contravenes Article 19 of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. It also directly contravenes Christ’s life-giving message of support to those on the margins in our society. The right of disabled people to live in their own homes is fundamental to an equal society and living out the Kingdom of God on earth.

The good news is that the devolved parliaments of Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland have all recognised the importance of its continuance in some form, and have secured this continuance. As the UK government has done no such thing across the board, the ILF will be closed in England. Users of the fund in England face a very unsure future.

The government claims that they have protected the future security of individuals who are losing their ILF support. Their argument is that they are giving local authorities the funding to cover the costs of the ILF within care packages.

They have in fact done no such thing.

They are providing this funding for only one year, and have not ring-fenced it. In some areas of England users may in effect be able to continue their support in its current form for one year. However, they have no security that this will be the case, and thereafter they have no idea how their support needs will be met. Many may very well be left without support which is vital for their independence and dignity at night. Others will be effectively forced into residential care where their independence will be severely curtailed.

As Christians. we should stand together in sending a message to this government that this is very wrong and indeed anti-Christian. Disabled or non-disabled, those of us who can must resist the corrosion of freedom and equality in our society. We cannot stand aside while this government continues to push those who are already marginalised further away from active engagement in society: this is one step in disempowering disabled people and rendering them more invisible.

DPAC’s final lobby of MPs on the issue takes place at the Houses of Parliament from 11.00am today (Wednesday 24th June). If you can’t attend, please email or send a letter to your MP.

DPAC’s website contains much more information, including several videos which go into more detail about how this cut will affect current users of the ILF in England.

Tory austerity agenda goes against Jesus’ teachings, says Christian group

The following news release was issued this morning.

Tory austerity agenda goes against Jesus’ teachings, says Christian group

Christians have been urged to take a stand against the UK government’s cuts agenda following the major anti-austerity demonstrations in London and Glasgow on Saturday.

Christians for Economic Justice called on church leaders to recognise that Tory policies are not compatible with Jesus’ example of siding with the poor. They urged them to take sides against austerity, supporting protests, strikes and nonviolent civil disobedience to resist policies that punish the poor for the sins of the rich. 

Christians for Economic Justice (CEJ) is the new name for Christianity Uncut, which is being relaunched today following a period of inactivity. CEJ applauds church leaders who criticise welfare cuts, but wants them to go further and challenge the economic system itself.

CEJ supporters come from a broad range of Christian backgrounds. They include clergy from several denominations.

Chris Wood, a spokesperson for Christians for Economic Justice, said:

Economic justice is at the centre of the biblical narrative. The prophets and Jesus spoke of Jubilee – the cancellation of debts – and the need to oppose usury. These values are incompatible with a capitalist economy in which wealth is hoarded by global elites. Austerity policies, wherever they appear around the world, serve to make things even worse by transferring more wealth from the poor to the rich.

This is not about being party-political, or pretending that we have all the answers. It’s about seeking to follow Jesus’ example of resisting injustice. As we do this we participate in the Kingdom of God, where all are treasured for their inherent human worth, loved by God, rather than for the fleeting value of money and possessions.”

CEJ, under its previous name of Christianity Uncut, has challenged disability cuts, corporate tax avoidance and high military spending. Christianity Uncut organised a ring of prayer at the eviction of the Occupy camp near St Paul’s Cathedral and later blocked an entrance to the London arms fair by kneeling in prayer and singing hymns.

ENDS

Notes

  1. Christians for Economic Justice is an informal network of Christians campaigning against the UK government’s cuts agenda and the wider injustices of capitalism. We are inspired by Jesus, who took nonviolent direct action in the Jerusalem Temple in solidarity with people who are poor, marginalised and exploited. The group was previously known as Christianity Uncut.
  1. Christians for Economic Justice are committed to active nonviolence, rejecting both violence and passivity. We reject verbal abuse and seek to act with a spirit of love for God and humanity rather than hatred towards those with whom we disagree.
  1. Christians for Economic Justice is the new name for Christianity Uncut, which was launched in 2011 but has been inactive since early 2014. Under its previous name the group’s actions included organising a ring of prayer at the eviction of the Occupy camp near St Paul’s Cathedral on 28 February 2012. Members of the group were arrested in September 2013 when they blocked entrances to Defence & Security Equipment International (DSEi), also known as the London arms fair.
  1. For more information, please contact CEJ on . 

We’re relaunching today!

“Do not store up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moth and rust consume and where thieves break in and steal; but store up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither moth nor rust consumes and where thieves do not break in and steal. For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also.” (Matthew 6:19-21, NRSV)

All has been quiet from Christianity Uncut for some time now, so we wanted to reassure you that we haven’t gone away!

Our silence has partly been due to our activists directing their energies towards other campaigns. However, we also felt that the time had come to reassess our focus as a campaigning group and recognise that the political narrative of austerity, backed up by the right-wing press, needs to be challenged on a systematic level.

As a result of this reflection we are pleased to announce that Christianity Uncut has taken the bold step to become Christians for Economic Justice (CEJ). Social justice cannot be separated from questions of economic justice in a climate of austerity and global economic liberalism, which hands power to financial elites at the expense of working people. We believe that Christians should be at the forefront in these campaigns as our witness to the Kingdom of God; a Kingdom, as Jesus proclaimed when reading from Isaiah, which will “bring good news to the poor” and “set at liberty those who are oppressed” (Lk 4:18).

In leaving behind the name “Christianity Uncut”, we want to be clear that we haven’t rejected the values and principles that the group was founded upon. The Uncut movement has been an inspiring and creative response to the first wave of Con-Dem austerity, highlighting the hypocrisy of slashing the welfare budget whilst doing little to hold international corporations to account for their tax dodging. With the election of a Conservative majority in the 2015 General Election, after a campaign in which the Conservatives were presented as the party of economic recovery, now more than ever we need to challenge the ideological and intellectual foundations upon which the austerity project has been built.

We at Christians for Economic Justice believe that in this political climate, the question that has been lost is “what kind of society do we want to build?”. A society in which global financial elites appropriate wealth and resources or one in which our financial resources are shared and managed responsibly for the benefit of people and planet? Free Market economists would have us believe that the discipline of Economics is a precise science with principles that we should follow without thought or question. And yet economic systems are mechanisms by which human beings negotiate complex social interactions, which means that moral questions cannot be ignored when considering the principles of economic policy.

We believe that economic justice is at the centre of the Biblical narrative. The Prophets and Jesus allude to the principles of Jubilee – the cancellation of debts – and the imperative of resisting usury. The gospel doesn’t present a systematic economic programme for us to discern for our time and context, and yet Jesus’ teachings place ethics at the heart of thinking around economic relationships which we believe are incompatible with capitalism. In the King James Version of the Lord’s Prayer, we are implored to ask: “forgive us our debts, as we also forgive our debtors” (Matthew 6:12). This compassion and forgiveness of debts is completely lacking in modern capitalism, where personal debt is positively encouraged to keep money circulating in the economy, and if all debts were to be cancelled or paid off, the whole system would collapse. Jesus, though, counsels debtors to resist their extortive creditors nonviolently in the Sermon on the Mount (Mt 5:40), and as followers of Jesus we are seeking to follow his example to resist economic and social injustice. As we do this we participate in the Kingdom of God, where all are treasured for their inherent human worth, loved by God, rather than the fleeting value of money and possessions (Matthew 6:19-21).

We’re not economists or policy-makers, and we don’t have all the answers to the economic issues that face us in this age of austerity but we do believe that the welfare cuts, which fall on the poor and the marginalised the hardest, need to be challenged. Most importantly, ethical considerations need to be at the forefront in shaping a new economic system which delivers justice and equality. We find in the teachings of Jesus and the prophets a creative and ethical challenge to capitalism as we explore new ways of organising our society for the good of all; We hope that you will join us in this journey.

St Paul's Cathedral protest

And so we close with the Lord’s Prayer:

Our Father which art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name.
Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread.
And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors.
And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil:
For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever. Amen.

Berkshire nukes factory heavily disrupted by four-hour protest

Construction work at the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) at Burghfield, Berkshire is still disrupted as the result of action by peaceful critics of nuclear weapons. Eight people blocked the main construction gate to the site for four hours this morning.

The eight people, aged between 19 and 40, arrived at the gate at 7.20am and locked themselves together.

Police were called as traffic queued up along the road. Vehicles were eventually diverted to a much longer route. The blockade was ended after four hours, but is continuing to delay the construction work.

The blockaders are supporters of Action AWE. They include Christian activists alongside members of Yorkshire CND.

Critics say the construction work should not be taking place even within the terms of the government’s official position, as no decision has yet been made on renewing the Trident nuclear weapons system. Ministers have announced £2bn of spending on development work at AWE, which includes the two sites of Burghfield and Aldermaston. A decision on Trident renewal is due in 2016.

The eight blockaders were supported by four others who helped with liaison with police and site staff. All have now left the site, some slightly bruised and overheated due to very hot weather, but aware that their sufferings are very minor compared to those they seek to prevent.

ImageThe construction gate to AWE Burghfield nonviolently blocked today.
(Photo credit: Nina Carter-Brown)

Andrew Dey, 25, from Bradford, said after leaving the gateway:

By blocking just one gate we were able to slow down work massively. We’ve also sent a message that we won’t tolerate the production of weapons of mass destruction in Britain.

We’re not calling for the Burghfield and Aldermaston bases to be shut down. We’re calling for them to stop working on nuclear proliferation. Those bases can be used for disarmament purposes. We don’t want those people to lose their jobs.”

Joanna Frew, 35, a member of the United Reformed Church, who lives in London but is originally from Scotland, said:

If God is a god of creation, then nuclear weapons are the complete opposite of that. We have to do everything in faith and prayer to be co-creators with God and not let destruction and fear be part of our society.”

Andrew and Joanna were joined by Catherine Bann, 40, a mother of two from Todmorden; Amy Clark, 19, a student from Bradford; Hannah Brock, 28, a Quaker from London; Matt Fawcett, 39, from Yorkshire CND; Chloe Skinner, 26, an Anglican and PhD student from Sheffield; and Phil Wood, 20, a student from Bradford.

Action AWE is a grassroots campaign of nonviolent actions dedicated to halting nuclear weapons production at AWE. Action AWE is committed to active nonviolence. It includes people of several religions and none.

Operated by a consortium of Jacobs Engineering Group, Lockheed Martin and Serco, AWE Burghfield plays an integral part in the final assembly and maintenance of nuclear warheads for use in the Trident system. In 2011 Peter Luff, the then Minister for Defence Equipment, announced £2 billion of spending for redevelopment of the Burghfield and Aldermaston weapons factories.

Polls consistently show that well over half of the British public are opposed to the renewal of Trident. The figure appears to be rising, with 79% opposing Trident renewal in a Guardian poll only last month.

Christians disrupt Berkshire nukes factory by joining blockade of entrance

Traffic is not entering the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) in Burghfield in Berkshire this morning, as critics of nuclear arms have blocked a major gate into the site by chaining themselves together. Many of those involved are Christians, including Anglicans, Quakers and others.

Eight people, aged between 19 and 40, lay down in the gateway at 7.20am, causing traffic intended for the facility to queue up along the road. The eight lying in the road are supported by others standing nearby to offer support and to liaise with police, site staff and the public. Several members of the group are now singing hymns while locked together in the gateway.

They are taking the action just ahead of European elections and a year before the general election. They want all candidates to commit themselves to opposing the renewal of the Trident nuclear weapons system, which polls show is opposed by the majority of the public.

Burghfield is one of the AWE’s two sites, seven miles from the better-known Aldermaston site.

The Christians are working alongside other supporters of Action AWE, a grassroots campaigning network, which is open to people of all religions and none.

They say that they felt led to take action due to the failure of governments to halt the evil of nuclear weapons production or to respond to public opinion.

Burghfield blockade 140519 -2Christians join with others to block the construction gate at AWE Burghfield.
(Photo credit: Nina Carter-Brown)

Andrew Dey, 25, an Anglican from Bradford, explained his motivation before he lay down in the gateway:

The nonviolent Christ entered situations of violence and brought love, light and truth. In the same way, I believe Christians should be taking action against weapons of mass destruction, such as the Trident nuclear weapons system.”

Hannah Brock, 28, a Quaker from London, who is also blocking the gate, added:

“I cannot stand by while the British government gives itself the power to murder millions, into the next generation. This isn’t the way of Jesus.”

Also in the gateway is Joanna Frew, 35, a member of the United Reformed Church, who lives in London but is originally from Scotland. She explained:

“Trident is illegal, immoral and a waste of money. It is the opposite of everything that Jesus teaches us about being co-creators of life and loving your enemies. Political and religious leaders in Scotland are opposed to retaining Trident at Faslane. We have a real opportunity over the next year to say that it is no longer acceptable , and that we don’t want an illegal renewal.”

Other people who are blocking the gate include Chloe Skinner, 26, an Anglican from Sheffield, who was recently acquitted of aggravated trespass at the London arms fair.

They are joined by Catherine Bann, 40, from Todmorden; Amy Clark, 19, from Bradford; Matt Fawcett, 39, from Yorkshire CND; and Phil Wood, 20, from Bradford.

For detailed updates on what is happening at the site, please follow @ActionAWE and @PutDowntheSword on Twitter.

 

Notes

  1. Action AWE is a grassroots campaign of nonviolent actions dedicated to halting nuclear weapons production at AWE. Action AWE is committed to active nonviolence. It includes people of several religions and none.

  2. Operated by a consortium of Jacobs Engineering Group, Lockheed Martin and Serco, AWE Burghfield plays an integral part in the final assembly and maintenance of nuclear warheads for use in the Trident system. In 2011 Peter Luff, the then Minister for Defence Equipment, announced £2 billion of spending for redevelopment of the Burghfield and Aldermaston weapons factories. The total spending on Weapons of Mass Destruction in the UK will soar to over £100bn should the government take the decision to renew Trident in 2016.
  3. The UK government has an armed nuclear submarine on patrol and ready to fire at all times, with the ability to wipe out cities almost anywhere on earth within 15 minutes. The UK government has a stockpile of around 225 nuclear warheads, each with eight times the explosive power of the bomb dropped on Hiroshima in 1945, that killed an estimated 140,000 to 200,000 people. Running the Trident nuclear weapons system currently costs £2 billion a year and has not seen any of the cutbacks facing other government spending and public services. The government will vote in 2016 to decide whether to invest in the UK’s Trident nuclear weapon system for another 30 years.Trident is not an “independent” system, but is dependent on technical support from the US.
  4. Eight people blocked the construction gate at AWE Burghfield at about 7.20am today. They are supported by a number of others standing nearby to offer support and to help with communication. Although many of those involved are Christians, they are happy to be working alongside other supporters of Action AWE of different religions and none.

  5. Polls consistently show that well over half of the British public are opposed to the renewal of Trident. The figure appears to be rising, with 79% opposing Trident renewal in a Guardian poll only last month. Please see http://www.cnduk.org/campaigns/no-to-trident/opinion-polls (external site).

End Hunger Fast

Christianity Uncut is proud to support End Hunger Fast. The plan is for Christians and others to fast during Lent in solidarity with people going hungry as a result of government policies and the wealth and power of the 1%.

Today (5th March) is Ash Wednesday, the beginning of Lent. It has traditionally been a time of fasting in the run-up to the feasting of Easter, when we  celebrate Jesus’ resurrection.

Many Christians give something up during Lent, or take on a new commitment. Some fast on particular days or from certain foods and drinks, such as meat or alcohol. In 2013, many Christianity Uncut supporters chose to give up trade with companies involved in tax-dodging and the Rev Chris Howson anointed Starbuck’s with ashes to call for repentance.

This year, large numbers of people – Christians, those of other religions and those of no religion – will fast in some way during Lent to show support to people going hungry as as result of government policies.

The same capitalist system that creates such obscene global inequality is pushing up poverty in the UK as the government continues with its all-out assault on the welfare state, while cutting taxes for the rich and ploughing billions into nuclear weapons.

Some people will fast on particular days – for example, every Friday. Others will fast from certain foods or at certain times. At least one person – Rev Keith Hebden, a Church of England priest – will eat nothing from today until Easter Sunday, consuming liquids only. Others, who choose not to fast, will back the campaign with prayer and action.

There will be a national day of fasting on Friday 4th April, already backed by a number of bishops, other church leaders and the Daily Mirror.

Fasting combines spirituality, solidarity and protest. Let’s reflect and seek God’s guidance on how we can resist the sins of inequality and share the world’s rich resources. 

Prosecutions fail as arms dealers avoid scrutiny

Following the acquittal of five Christians charged over a protest at the London arms fair, the authorities have dropped charges against other anti-arms activists arrested around the same time. However, two peaceful protesters are still facing trial and will appear in Stratford Magistrates’ Court next week.

Not guilty

On 4th February, five Christians – James Clayton, Symon Hill, Chloe Skinner, Chris Wood and Daniel Woodhouse – were declared ‘Not Guilty’ of aggravated trespass. They had blocked one of the entrances to the London arms fair (Defence & Security Equipment International, or DSEi) on 10th September 2013 by kneeling in prayer and singing hymns. The District Judge ruled that they had a reasonable grounds for expecting the police to give another warning before arresting them.

Dan, Chris, Chloe, Symon and James have thanked the many people who turned up at court to support them and the hundreds more who sent messages of support or prayed about the case.

During the trial, a Ministry of Defence police officer admitted under cross-examination that the police on duty at DSEi had been briefed about possible protests but not about possible illegal activity by arms dealers. This is despite the fact that illegal equipment had been removed from DSEi on the previous five occasions (but only when it was publicly exposed). On the day that the five Christians were arrested, two companies were removed from DSEi for displaying torture equipment. This happened only after it was raised in Parliament and the police officer testified that he had not even been told about it.

Charges dropped

Several other peaceful campaigners, both Christian and non-Christian, were due to face trial next week for blocking the road leading to DSEi on 8th September 2013. Yesterday, most of them heard that the charges had been dropped.

It is not clear why this has happened. It may be that the authorities wish to avoid publicity or more questions to police officers about the briefings they are given at DSEi. Those concerned were all planning to run a “necessity” defence, arguing that they intervened at the arms fair to prevent torture, war crimes and other crimes against humanity. This was likely to entail lots of questions about precisely what measures had (or had not) been taken against illegal weapons dealers by police, organisers and the Crown Prosecution Service.

It seems that the authorities are running scared of public scrutiny.

Three still on trial

The arms dealers have had a bad time, with five of their critics acquitted and charges dropped against most of the rest. However, three people are still facing charges and will be in court next week. Siobhan Grimes is an Anglican and a member of Christianity Uncut’s co-ordinating group. Sylvia Boyes is a Quaker with a lifelong record of resistance to war and the arms industry. Daniel Ashman may also be tried; this remains unclear. Your support and prayers are again needed. We offer love and solidarity to them all.

We have a very long way to go to defeat the arms industry and the government’s support for it. But recent weeks have reminded us that public opinion is on our side. The breadth of opposition to the arms trade is increasingly clear.

As recent developments show, the arms industry is frightened of publicity. Let’s publicise it.

“Have no fear of them; for nothing is covered up that will not be uncovered and nothing secret  that will not become known. What I say to you in the dark, tell in the light; and what you hear whispered, proclaim from the housetops.” – Jesus (Matthew 10,26-27; NRSV).

Post Navigation